Archive for January 2015

Jun-uary Mountain Biking in the High Sierra and Foothills!   Leave a comment

By Tim Hauserman

When one is presented with a less then optimal winter in the snow department, it’s time to squeeze those lemons and make some lemonade. Within 45 minutes of Truckee several great mountain biking trails are in tip top condition and ready to ride. So get out there and enjoy the dirt until the snow flies.

 

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Photos courtesy of Kelly Conley

 

Heading down Highway 20

Drive 25 miles west on Interstate 80, and then take Highway 20 towards Nevada City. The next 22 miles you pass through a deep forest of conifers, briefly interrupted by several awesome viewpoints. The second one, Alpha Omega Vista has restrooms and a view of the eroded hillsides that are the still visible impacts of the Gold Rush. Five miles east of Nevada City you reach the Harmony Ridge Market on your right. Park in the Trail Parking lot, and decide on your trail option: Pioneer Trail or the Scotts Flat Trail.

The Pioneer Trail starts on the Harmony Market side and follows the highway back the way you came. It’s a lovely gentle climb for five miles, all rideable for just about any mountain biker. At five miles the trail crosses the road, and begins to get more challenging and steep. This is a good turn around point for many. Eventually it reaches all the way back to the Alpha Omega Rest Stop, which would be a fairly lengthy adventure.

The Scotts Flat Trail sits across the highway, and about one hundred yards uphill of the Market. This trail, recently constructed for mountain bikers, begins with a rolling jaunt at the top of the hill before heading down a long series of fun switchbacks to Scotts Flat Reservoir. Strong riders will have a blast and can turn around and ride back up, while others can follow the more gentle paved road to climb back to the start.

 

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Photos courtesy of Kelly Conley

 

Peavine

Take the first McCarran Exit off Interstate 80 at the eastern edge of Reno. Head north past all of the commercial hubbub for a mile or two to Keystone, turn left. You will find trailhead on your right. A map of the extensive network of trails sits at the beginning of the ride, the trick will be remembering this map once you’ve been riding for awhile. It’s a high desert romp on popular trails, sometimes rocky, but mostly quite rideable, with beautiful views of the Reno metropolis and the high desert.

 

Photos courtesy of Kelly Conley

Photos courtesy of Kelly Conley

 

THINK OF ME, LYNN RICHARDSON, FOR ALL OF YOUR LAKE TAHOE AND TRUCKEE REAL ESTATE NEEDS!

lynnrichardson.net

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Truckee and Tahoe Back in the Day: The Words of Isabella Byrd   Leave a comment

By Tim Hauserman

 

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Recently I was lucky enough to be directed to the words of Isabella Byrd. She was a young woman who traveled across the country by herself, a pretty rare event back in the 1870s, and wrote a lively journal about her experience. While the story is somewhat embellished, it still gives a fun impression of our beloved Truckee and Lake Tahoe, at that time:

Upon arriving by train Isabella said: “Truckee, the center of the “lumbering region” of the Sierras, is usually spoken of as “a rough mountain town,” and Mr. W. had told me that all the roughs of the district congregated there, that there were nightly pistol affrays in bar-rooms, etc., The cars drew up in a street—if street that could be called which was only a wide, cleared space, intersected by rails, with here and there a stump, and great piles of sawn logs bulking big in the moonlight, and a number of irregular clap-board, steep-roofed houses, many of them with open fronts, glaring with light and crowded with men. We had pulled up at the door of a rough Western hotel, with a partially open front, being a bar-room crowded with men drinking and smoking, and the space between it and the cars was a moving mass of loafers and passengers. A band was playing noisily, and the unholy sound of tom-toms was not far off. Mountains—the Sierras of many a fireside dream—seemed to wall in the town, and great pines stood out, sharp and clear cut, against a sky in which a moon and stars were shining frostily.

The accommodation is too limited for the population of 2,000,[2] which is masculine mainly, and is liable to frequent temporary additions, and beds are occupied continuously, though by different occupants, throughout the greater part of the twenty-four hours. Consequently I found the bed and room allotted to me quite tumbled looking. Men’s coats and sticks were hanging up, miry boots were littered about, and a rifle was in one corner. There was no window to the outer air, but I slept soundly, being only once awoke by an increase of the same din in which I had fallen asleep, varied by three pistol shots fired in rapid succession.”

The next day Isabella rode a horse along the Truckee River to Tahoe, “this mountain-girdled lake lay before me, with its margin broken up into bays and promontories, most picturesquely clothed by huge sugar pines. It lay dimpling and scintillating beneath the noonday sun, as entirely unspoilt as fifteen years ago, when its pure loveliness was known only to trappers and Indians. One man lives on it the whole year round; otherwise early October strips its shores of their few inhabitants, and thereafter, for seven months, it is rarely accessible except on snowshoes. It never freezes. In the dense forests which bound it, are hordes of grizzlies, brown bears, wolves, elk, deer, chipmunks, martens, minks, skunks, foxes, squirrels, and snakes. On its margin I found an irregular wooden inn, with a lumber-wagon at the door, on which was the carcass of a large grizzly bear, shot behind the house this morning. I had intended to ride ten miles farther, but, finding that the trail in some places was a “blind” one, and being bewitched by the beauty and serenity of Tahoe, I have remained here sketching, reveling in the view from the veranda, and strolling in the forest. At this height there is frost every night of the year, and my fingers are benumbed.”

Yep, hasn’t changed a bit.

 

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THINK OF ME, LYNN RICHARDSON, FOR ALL OF YOUR LAKE TAHOE AND TRUCKEE REAL ESTATE NEEDS!

lynnrichardson.net

Year End Market Review for Truckee and North Lake Tahoe   Leave a comment

Donner Lake Sunset. Photo by Michelle Portesi

Donner Lake Sunset. Photo by Michelle Portesi

It’s finally here:  The 2014 year end market review for Truckee, North Tahoe and Donner Summit.  It compares 2014 with 2013.  There are four pages; Total Market Summary, North Lake Tahoe, Truckee and Donner Summit.  Please click on the link below and scroll on down and you will see other market reviews for 2013 and 2012.  Please feel free to contact me with any questions.

https://yourfriendinhighplaces.wordpress.com/north-lake-tahoe-truckee-real-estate-market-stats/

 

 

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